VIS Radom P35

Post Reply
User avatar
Texas Hangman
Wet Tinder
Posts: 155
Joined: Sun Dec 22, 2013 3:29 pm
Location: Cameron County
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

VIS Radom P35

Post by Texas Hangman » Sun Apr 19, 2015 10:27 pm

This is a antique VIS Radom P 35 ("P 35(p)") that my father purchased off a fellow solier when he was in the Air Force. This one was made under German Rule early on during WWII, making it 70-75 years old. When my father purchased it, it had some home made grips on it and the take down lever is missing. It's possible the grips and take down lever were damaged in combat. This is a very interesting firearm with a neat history.

ImageVIS Radom P35 by Blake Tyler, on Flickr

The design was generally based on American firearms inventor John Browning's Colt M1911 A1, operating on the short-recoil principle, with the barrel being cammed down and away from the locking lugs in the slide. Unlike M1911, the barrel was not cammed by a link, but by a ledge of sorts, which contacts a portion of the barrel and forces it down as it is moved rearward with the slide by the recoil force. It differs from M1911A1 also in other details. Its characteristic feature was a triangular grip shape, wider at the bottom, offering good ergonomics and firm grip.[1] On the right side grip cover, the pistol had letters VIS in a triangle, on the left side—FB (for Fabryka Broni—"Arms Factory").

ImageVIS Radom P35 by Blake Tyler, on Flickr

The handgun was prepared in late 1930, and at the beginning of 1931 the first pistols were ready for testing. Initially it was named WiS (anacronym of the Polish designers' names), later the name was changed to Vis, meaning "force" in Latin, with the wz. abbreviation for wzór("model").


The tests proved that the handgun was very accurate and stable (due to its size and mass, most stresses are absorbed and not passed on the shooter), while at the same time remaining reliable after firing more than 6,000 rounds. The Vis was generally regarded as one of the best military pistols of that period. Production started in the state armory Fabryka Broni in Radom in late 1935, and the following year it was introduced as the standard weapon of Polish infantry and cavalry officers. Successively, other units were to be equipped, and by 1942 all other handguns were scheduled to be withdrawn from service. By mid-1938, it was introduced to the armored and air forces. Before the Invasion of Poland, approximately 49,400 (out of 90,000 ordered) were delivered to the army.

ImageVIS Radom P35 by Blake Tyler, on Flickr

After the Polish defeat in 1939, the Germans took over the Radom Armory and continued production of the Vis under the new name of 9 mm Pistole 645(p), which was for some reason often rendered as P 35(p) (the suffix "p" means "polnische") (the German pistols of the first series had inscriptions VIS Mod.35 and P.35(p) on the left side). Up to 1945, between 312,000 and 380,000 were produced and used by the German paratroopers and police.

User avatar
GreyOne
Fair Weather Camper
Posts: 73
Joined: Sat Jul 26, 2014 2:36 pm
Location: North edge of DFW, on the west side.
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 2 times

Re: VIS Radom P35

Post by GreyOne » Sun Jun 12, 2016 2:39 pm

The Radom was an excellent design, and well made. The later Nazi wartime production was much rougher in finish, but still very serviceable.

My senior year in high school my girl friend had her grandmother living with them, and the Grandmother had a Radom under her pillow. I became her new favorite when I offered to clean it, and actually knew how to disassemble it. Cleaned it up, reloaded it with some new ammo, and back it went to the pillow. Her husband had brought it back from WWII, and she was very very proud of that pistol. I wonder if that old girlfriend still has that gun?
Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without !- Grandad's advice

Okcmco
Fair Weather Camper
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2018 6:07 am
Has thanked: 16 times
Been thanked: 21 times

Re: VIS Radom P35

Post by Okcmco » Fri May 22, 2020 6:40 am

I have always loved this pistol but strangely have never gotten my hands on one. Sometimes you get a design that is an amalgamation of many designs and it manages to take the best from all and to make a piece that is better than the piece that it was based upon. The CZ 75 comes to mind as well. But the Radom Just screams early 20th century surplus cool


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Post Reply